Slider Image
Slider Image
Slider Image
Slider Image
Slider Image
Slider Image
Slider Image

Confocal microscopic image of the infection of a wheat plant: the fungus penetrates the stomata of the leaves and can spread between the plant cells.

Photo courtesy:
J. Haueisen, Stukenbrock lab

Two pipefish females of the species Syngnathus typhle.

Photo courtesy:
Olivia Roth

The fluorescent dye DAPI is commonly used to stain the DNA in the nuclei of Caenorhabditis elegans body cells, thus visualizing the nematode’s anatomy.

Photo courtesy:
Hinrich Schulenburg

Confocal laser scanning microscopy image of the fungal pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici (in green) during the infection of a wheat leaf. The hyphae of Z. tritici is visible in green.

Photo courtesy:
J. Haueisen, Stukenbrock lab

The brood pouch of a pregnant pipefish male (Syngnathus typhle) filled with embryos that are connected to a placenta-like structure.

Photo courtesy:
Olivia Roth

Pathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria marked by Red Fluorescent Protein have infected and overgrown the body of a Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

Photo courtesy:
Andrei Papkou, Schulenburg lab

A wheat leaf infested with the fungus Zymoseptoria tritici shows the typical signs of so-called leaf drought, which can lead to drastic crop failures.

Photo courtesy:
J. Haueisen, Stukenbrock lab

DFG Research Training Group for Translational Evolutionary Research

The RTG TransEvo is a Research Training Group funded by the German Science Foundation  (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft; Graduiertenkolleg GRK 2501). The RTG  TransEvo aims at studying and promoting the relevance of evolutionary principles to applied problems. Unintended outcomes of human intervention often result from actions that influence natural selection, e.g. the usage of antibiotics or anti-cancer drugs in medicine, of pesticides in agriculture, or human perturbation of the earth’s ecosystems. Surprisingly, evolutionary concepts are only rarely used to improve our understanding of these applied challenges and to develop new sustainable solutions.

The overarching aim of the RTG TransEvo is to train two main competences in doctoral candidates:

  • the use of knowledge and concepts from fundamental research in evolutionary biology in order to enhance our understanding of current challenges in applied fields, and
  • the use of the novel insights obtained in order to enrich our understanding of evolution.

Although evolutionary theory is occasionally considered for applied problems, this is usually done independently in the distinct applied fields, often using different approaches.

Infographic Infographic

The TransEvo doctoral training is explicitly interdisciplinary and organized in tandem projects - two sub-projects that address a related problem, yet use distinct albeit complementary research approaches - directly generating potential for synergistic interactions. The doctoral training further includes a structured program with several complementary elements, such as initial rotations, a monthly TransEvo Core Seminars, various science and soft skill courses, yearly retreats, and workshops.

Moreover, the RTG TransEvo provides training for young postdocs, directly after their doctorate, to help them acquire the necessary leadership and management skills for career development.

Announcements

Doctoral Researcher Position in Computational Genomics at IKMB

Leibniz ScienceCampus EvoLUNG receives new funding
Leibniz ScienceCampus EvoLUNG receives new funding

New article from the Reusch lab

Yu L, Boström C, Franzenburg S et al. (2020): Somatic genetic drift and multilevel selection in a clonal seagrass. Nature Ecology and Evolution.

Fungal infections
Fungal infections